WWF UK Blog Elias Kimaru

Elias Kimaru's latest posts

Plastic pollution is threatening marine life © Brent Stirton/Getty Images/WWF-UK Coastal Kenya Programme

Bringing the plastic pollution war closer to home in Kenya

Global nations have come to realise that plastic pollution is choking our oceans, causing irreversible damage to marine biodiversity and ecosystem health. We’re bringing the plastic pollution war closer to home in Kenya. It’s time for everyone to connect the dots and start bending the curve – reversing the decline in wildlife. This cannot wait […]

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Waatha children resting. © Ahmed Mbarak. Size of Wales

The Waatha people of Kenya

Indigenous people are known to have a very close relationship with nature. Their lives and livelihoods are often intertwined with it. Over the many years of their existence, they have developed strong systems and practices to ensure its continuity. The People Many of you will have heard about the Mijikenda people and their sacred Kaya […]

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River management techniques, South Africa Size of Wales

Keeping the water flowing – how farmers in South Africa are protecting supplies for future generations

As I boarded the plane to fly to South Africa for the very first time, I was full of excitement and expectation. I’d heard many great things about WWF’s Mondi Wetlands Programme and now I had the opportunity to experience this work first hand. It was going to be invaluable learning for the work we’re […]

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The old way of cooking (L) compared to the new stoves being installed (R) climate change

How new cooking stoves are helping Kenya protect its threatened forests

Last Month, WWF led the world in marking the Earth Hour; the world’s biggest environmental event, organized in all continents to create understanding on the issues facing the planet and inspiring people to live more sustainably. While the world was marking the event, here in at WWF in Kwale, Kenya, we were busy putting this […]

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African elephant © Richard Barrett / WWF-UK Size of Wales

A plan for water in Kwale: vital for forests, wildlife and people

Water is a major issue for everyone in Kenya. The country is classified as ‘chronically water scarce’ and demands for water largely exceeds the available supply. Many of our key industries, such as agriculture, tourism and energy production, are highly dependent on rainfall and water availability. At the same time, rapidly increasing urban populations and […]

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A farmer in Kwale walks among timber in the forest Coastal Kenya Programme

How WWF is helping locals in Kenya to grow their forests and protect the environment

Kenya’s forests are deteriorating at an alarming rate. In fact, recent studies put the loss of forests in Kenya at around 50,000 hectares annually. That means the Kenyan economy loses over Sh1.9 billion – almost £14.5 million. At the same time, the national wood supply deficit is expected to rise to 7 million cubic metres by 2020. That’s […]

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Mijikenda sacred Kaya forests Size of Wales

How building relationships is key to protecting Kenya’s incredible coastal forests

If you’ve been following my blog, you’ll know that we’re working hard to protect Kenya’s beautiful forests and make sure that they’re managed in a sustainable way – but we can’t do it alone. In 2010, Kenya adopted a new Constitution which moved a lot of the responsibility for managing our rich and wonderful natural […]

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A member of Kaya Kinondo Financial Services Association © WWF Kenya Size of Wales

Protecting Kenya’s sacred forests and changing people’s lives through ecotourism and village banking

For almost 20 years now, we’ve been working hard to promote the conservation of Kaya forests in Kenya, supporting local people to build their communities and protect their environment. Encouraging ecotourism helped bring in money to support people and nature, but communities still faced barriers. So here I explain how a Financial Services Association, set up […]

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Meeting members of an indigenous community. Size of Wales

Kaya forests – a Kenyan example of indigenous peoples’ and community conserved areas

Many indigenous communities hold a very close relationship with nature, and have done so for millennia, often using traditional governance and management systems to promote harmonious co-existence between people and the environment. The relationship between indigenous communities and nature is much richer than any words can truly express, but it’s clear that it’s often a […]

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