WWF UK Blog Mike Olendo

Mike Olendo's latest posts

Knowledge – improving lives in ocean and coastal systems

Sharing experiences, successes and challenges is a really important way in which we learn.  Recently, my colleagues and I were lucky enough to attend the ninth Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association (WIOMSA) scientific symposium in South Africa to showcase our work in Lamu and exchange ideas with colleagues working in similar fields elsewhere in […]

Read more
Fisherman in Lamu ©Rika Theron

Giving fisherfolk training for sustaining in Lamu

Fish stocks in Lamu seascape are the most abundant and robust for coral reefs in Kenya. Located at the southern end of the Somali upwelling, the nutrient rich waters of Lamu seascape provide the optimal conditions for Kenya’s best stocks of pelagic (open ocean), demersal (near or at the bottom of a body of water) […]

Read more
Lamu ©Lilian Mulupi/WWF

Mapping the Mangroves

Mangrove forests are incredibly important, often an undervalued ecosystem. Lamu seascape is home to the largest continuous mangrove forest in Kenya and protecting it is a vital part of the work that we do in this region. Over the last few weeks my team and I have been out surveying the mangroves. This can be […]

Read more
baby turtle hatchlings © WWF-Kenya

Kenya’s Lamu seascape – pristine, important and threatened

The Lamu seascape is located at the northernmost part of Kenya’s coast line. It starts from the Tana river delta in the South and stretches to the Kenya – Somalia border in the north. The Lamu archipelago comprise of approximately fifty five islands which are mainly made up of fossilised sand dunes or raised beaches. […]

Read more