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Artisanal fishing boats in the port of Nouadhibou© Bertramz/CC

Poor fisheries management hurts the most vulnerable

The recent Chatham House forum on illegal fishing confirmed the importance of world fisheries as a source of food and income. It also showed that the most vulnerable people continue to bear the brunt of illegal fishing, over-fishing and latent geopolitical tensions, all increasingly compounded by the effects of climate change. Presentations and discussions underlined […]

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Durdle Door. Beaches are among the natural settings with most well-being benefit © Will Ashley-Cantello forests

On the nature of happiness: mental health and the environment

Stress. Depression. Anxiety. Just plain mental fatigue. These are some of the causes of mental ill health that are increasingly common in our society. Spending more time in nature can help us with these. In fact, poor mental health is the largest cause of disability in the UK and rates are on the increase. There […]

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Mkuu Shelali (Rahma VSLA) when she was training as a Community Based Trainer (CBT). © WWF

Improving coastal livelihoods in Kenya

Communities in Lamu seascape on the northern coast of Kenya rely on the sea. For most people, artisanal fishing is the main livelihood source. But coastal and marine habitats in Kenya are facing a multitude of threats. Unprecedented population growth, habitat alteration, intensive and unsustainable expansion of agricultural practices, destructive fishing techniques and large-scale developments […]

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Yellowfin in the fish market in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania © Wetjens Dimmlich / WWF-Oceans Practice

Who’s afraid of transparency in fisheries?

There was both rejoicing and some concern last Thursday after the European Parliament voted on major improvements to strengthen transparency and accountability in EU fisheries abroad. This move by the EU to extend its obligations and principles to all its vessels that fish abroad is welcome as it promotes sustainable development, food security and healthy […]

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WWF Briefing Future of UK Seas A4 cover page

Brexit and the 83%: What future for wider UK seas?

The below is a short version of a speech I’m giving on Brexit to today’s Coastal Futures conference, the leading annual UK conference on marine and coastal issues. You’ve heard a lot about the 48% and the 52% in the EU Referendum aftermath. I want to throw in another percentage: 83%. That’s the rough percentage […]

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Blue Fin Tuna © Whitepointer

Good news among sea of concerns

Good news is not that frequent in the sea of information threatening to drown us in despair. However, two recent developments in the European Union are notable for the positive promises they carry. They are not by any means eye-catching headlines but they have the potential to lead to healthier marine ecosystems and fish stocks […]

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WWF's Living Planet Report found that we risk a 67% decline in global populations of vertebrate species by 2020 if we don't act now. © Martin Harvey / WWF living planet report

Government and business must work together to stop environmental decline

The Living Planet Report, which was published recently by the global conservation organisation WWF, highlighted the alarming rate at which species all over the world are declining. Iconic animals like African elephants, polar bears, and mountain gorillas are all at risk. So are ones that we may be more familiar with like salmon, butterflies, and […]

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WWF's Living Planet Report found that we risk a 67% decline in global populations of vertebrate species by 2020 if we don't act now. © Martin Harvey / WWF living planet report

Rhaid i’r Llywodraeth a busnesau gydweithio i atal dirywiad amgylcheddol

Tynnodd yr Adroddiad Planed Fyw, a gyhoeddwyd yn ddiweddar gan y sefydliad cadwraethol byd-eang WWF, sylw at y ffordd frawychus mae rhywogaethau ledled y byd yn prinhau. Mae anifeiliaid eiconig fel eliffantod Affrica, eirth gwyn a gorilaod mynydd i gyd mewn perygl. Felly hefyd rhai rydyn ni’n fwy cyfarwydd â nhw, fel eogiaid, ieir bach […]

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Young girls from Ndau Primary School pose for a photo with their teacher after participating in the clean-up on Ndau beach © WWF-Kenya/Sabina Odero

International Coastal Clean-up in Kiunga Marine Protected Area

Every year, on the third Saturday in September, volunteers of all ages and backgrounds come together across the globe to help clean rubbish from our coastal shoreline and waterways. In Kiunga Marine Protected Area we’ve been playing out part to contribute to this global cleaning effort. Spearheaded by the Ocean Conservancy, the International Coastal Clean-up […]

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