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Lamu seascape © Cath Lawson

Community engagement in natural resource management






Enhancing community participation in natural resource management, in both the terrestrial and marine sphere, is an enormous part of the work that WWF is doing in Kenya. Recently we’ve been supporting the establishment and strengthening of the County Wildlife Conservation and Compensation Committee (CWCCC) in Lamu, as well as other CWCCCs elsewhere in the coastal […]

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Moy wind farm, Inverness

Mars UK: a giant leap towards sustainability






At Mars, as one of the world’s largest food manufacturers, we recognise that we are in a position to positively influence and advocate for policy change. We can do this through leading by example, making bold commitments and meeting our own ambitious targets to tackle the impact we have on the environment. That’s why we […]

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Ivory-Inferno-Gabon. Copyright: WWF-Canon / James Morgan Illegal Wildlife trade

Will ivory burn fuel the fire for action?






On Saturday 30 April, the world’s largest ever ivory destruction will take place. Kenya will be burning 105 tonnes of ivory, along with 1.5 tonnes of rhino horn, in Nairobi National Park. This will be a strong symbolic gesture that Kenya will not tolerate the illegal wildlife trade that is killing so many of its […]

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Baby turtle leaving nest © WWF/Mike Olendo

Combating marine turtle poaching






Marine turtles are iconic and ancient creatures. They are long lived and slow maturing, taking decades (between 20 and 30 years) to reach sexual maturity, but only about one in 1,000 successfully hatched babies makes it to adulthood.  Life as a turtle is tough! But we’re doing everything we can to safeguard the future of […]

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Ranger looking out © Robert Magori

6 reasons we’re on the lookout for black rhinos in Kenya






Black rhinos in African have suffered huge reductions in the past, mainly due to poaching. Listed as Critically Endangered under the IUCN Red List, there are currently about 5000 animals remaining in the wild (there were 65,000 in 1970).  As part of WWF-UK’s support work to raise numbers and improve security around the species – […]

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Giant panda in tree, Wolong Nature Reserve, China © Bernard De Wetter/WWF

15 highlights from 2015 for WWF






Look back over this past year and explore some standout stories from 2015. They really demonstrate how varied our global projects are! Whether it’s Arctic exploring with JacksGap, eco-fashion tips for ‘Wear It Wild’ or a GoPro strapped to a turtle in the Great Barrier Reef, you’re bound to discover something exciting as we look back at 2015. 1. Rod Downie […]

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Knowledge – improving lives in ocean and coastal systems






Sharing experiences, successes and challenges is a really important way in which we learn.  Recently, my colleagues and I were lucky enough to attend the ninth Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association (WIOMSA) scientific symposium in South Africa to showcase our work in Lamu and exchange ideas with colleagues working in similar fields elsewhere in […]

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Eastern Himalayas © Global Warming images / WWF

Teas to protect tigers, rhinos and elephants






How have boxes of Pukka tea been helping tigers, elephants and the people who share their wild landscape? Over the last three years Pukka and their fantastic customers have generously donated over £200,000 to WWF. We’re looking back at how this partnership has helped us protect the wildlife and communities living in the region known […]

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