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A farmer in Kwale walks among timber in the forest Coastal Kenya Programme

How WWF is helping locals in Kenya to grow their forests and protect the environment

Kenya’s forests are deteriorating at an alarming rate. In fact, recent studies put the loss of forests in Kenya at around 50,000 hectares annually. That means the Kenyan economy loses over Sh1.9 billion – almost £14.5 million. At the same time, the national wood supply deficit is expected to rise to 7 million cubic metres by 2020. That’s […]

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A member of Kaya Kinondo Financial Services Association © WWF Kenya Size of Wales

Protecting Kenya’s sacred forests and changing people’s lives through ecotourism and village banking

For almost 20 years now, we’ve been working hard to promote the conservation of Kaya forests in Kenya, supporting local people to build their communities and protect their environment. Encouraging ecotourism helped bring in money to support people and nature, but communities still faced barriers. So here I explain how a Financial Services Association, set up […]

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Aweer woman weaving © WWF Kenya

Traditional knowledge is helping safeguard the future of Kenya’s threatened forests

I remember it like it was yesterday. Several years ago we were engaged in a meeting with the indigenous Aweer community discussing their rights in relation to natural resources. The Aweer, traditionally hunter-gatherers, live in Boni Dodori, a part of Kenya which is home to a rich array of wildlife. We’d been discussing at length why the […]

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Meeting members of an indigenous community. Size of Wales

Kaya forests – a Kenyan example of indigenous peoples’ and community conserved areas

Many indigenous communities hold a very close relationship with nature, and have done so for millennia, often using traditional governance and management systems to promote harmonious co-existence between people and the environment. The relationship between indigenous communities and nature is much richer than any words can truly express, but it’s clear that it’s often a […]

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Patients waiting to be weighed as part of MEDCAP in Tswaka, Kenya 2012. © Tech. Sgt. Daniel St Pierre, 4th Combat Camera Squadron Size of Wales

Wildlife, water, and the climate: understanding well-being in Kenya

Happy New Year! A new year often makes us think about how happy and healthy we are, and we’ve been thinking about that here too. One of our biggest goals here is to improve people’s well-being, because the health of people is intrinsically linked with the health of the forests and wildlife around them – we […]

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An ancient, indigenous tree in Boni. The forest ecosystem is important to both people and the environment in Kenya. © US AID Size of Wales

WWF working to protect people and wildlife from development projects in Kenya

Lamu County, and in particular the Boni-Dodori forest, is an incredibly diverse and rich area. It’s also home to the indigenous Aweer community who depend on beautiful and important area for their livelihoods including food, shelter, herbal medicine, cultural practices and spiritual needs. Development A few kilometers away from this important forest are two emerging major […]

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A fisherman in Kenya Size of Wales

Dredging in Kenya: an update on the campaign to save beautiful beaches and precious habitats

In my last blog I brought to your attention plans to remove millions of tonnes of sea sand and debris off the south coast of Kenya which poses great danger to fragile habitats, wildlife and people’s livelihoods. This blog is to update you on this issue – the struggle is still on and far from […]

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Locals and WWF staff in the Maasai Mara Size of Wales

Seeing is believing

This month I’m sharing a story from my WWF colleagues Nickson Orwa, Neema Suya and Hassan Mohammed who are accompanying some of our partners on an exchange visit to the Maasai Mara… Learning by seeing is one of the best ways in which we learn and we’ve found this to be true time and time […]

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