WWF UK Blog  

Celebrating British wildlife in pictures

 
  • Coast and Marine Winner: Paul Colley’s ‘Beautiful Blues’ (Blue shark, Prionace glauca), English Channel south of Penzance, Cornwall, England.

    Coast and Marine Winner: Paul Colley’s ‘Beautiful Blues’ (Blue shark, Prionace glauca), English Channel south of Penzance, Cornwall, England.

  • Highly commended Mark Webster ‘Rhyzostoma Jellyfish’ (Barrel jellyfish, Rhizostoma pulmo) Nare Head, Cornwall, England.

    Highly commended Mark Webster ‘Rhyzostoma Jellyfish’ (Barrel jellyfish, Rhizostoma pulmo) Nare Head, Cornwall, England.

  • Highly commended Will Clark ‘Blue Shark Bump’, South of Penzance, Cornwall, England.

    Highly commended Will Clark ‘Blue Shark Bump’, South of Penzance, Cornwall, England.

  • Highly commended Andrew Parkinson ‘Sea Spray’ (Northern gannet, Morus bassanus), Shetland Isles, Scotland.

    Highly commended Andrew Parkinson ‘Sea Spray’ (Northern gannet, Morus bassanus), Shetland Isles, Scotland.

  • Highly commended Jeremy Moore ‘Submerged Forest after Winter Storms’, Borth and Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales.

    Highly commended Jeremy Moore ‘Submerged Forest after Winter Storms’, Borth and Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales.

  • Highly commended Mike Snelle ‘Common Dolphin’ (Common dolphin, Dephinus delphis), Pembrokeshire, Wales.

    Highly commended Mike Snelle ‘Common Dolphin’ (Common dolphin, Dephinus delphis), Pembrokeshire, Wales.

  • Highly commended Danny Green ‘Common Seal Pup in a Sandstorm’ (Common seal, Halichoerus grypus) Lincolnshire, England.

    Highly commended Danny Green ‘Common Seal Pup in a Sandstorm’ (Common seal, Halichoerus grypus) Lincolnshire, England.

  • Highly commended Brydon Thomason ‘Bird’s Eye View’ (Northern gannet, Morus bassanus), Unst, Shetland Isles, Scotland.

    Highly commended Brydon Thomason ‘Bird’s Eye View’ (Northern gannet, Morus bassanus), Unst, Shetland Isles, Scotland.

  • Highly commended Richard Shucksmith ‘Otter and the Octopus’ (European otter, Lutra lutra) Shetland Isles, Scotland.

    Highly commended Richard Shucksmith ‘Otter and the Octopus’ (European otter, Lutra lutra) Shetland Isles, Scotland.

  • Highly commended Richard Shucksmith ‘Puffling’ (Puffin, Fratercula arctica), Shetland Isles, Scotland.

    Highly commended Richard Shucksmith ‘Puffling’ (Puffin, Fratercula arctica), Shetland Isles, Scotland.

  • Highly commended Mark Ellison ‘Kittiwake Colony’ (Kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla; Razorbill, Alca torda), Noss NNR, Shetland Isles, Scotland.

    Highly commended Mark Ellison ‘Kittiwake Colony’ (Kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla; Razorbill, Alca torda), Noss NNR, Shetland Isles, Scotland.

  • Highly commended Trevor Rees ‘Burrowing Anemone’ (Burrowing anemone, Cerianthus lloydii) Lochaline, Sound of Mull, Scotland.

    Highly commended Trevor Rees ‘Burrowing Anemone’ (Burrowing anemone, Cerianthus lloydii) Lochaline, Sound of Mull, Scotland.

For someone who’s passionate about conservation photography and our wonderful wildlife, it’s an exciting time. It’s when I get to view, and judge, the best of the British Wildlife Photography Awards (BWPA). And this year’s WWF-sponsored Coast and Marine category didn’t disappoint. It delivered a spectacular snapshot of the incredible range of species that grace our coasts and seas. Here’s my own snapshot of the finalists…

As you’ll see from our beautiful gallery above, it’s interesting to see how the wonders of our British waters are captured by both professional and amateur photographers. To me, this year’s images represent the nation’s love of wildlife and wild places. I believe that competitions like the BWPA are vital, as they promote the incredible biodiversity we have here in the UK.

A great example is Mike Sneale’s photo of the common dolphin. The image was taken in an important area for seabirds and dolphins called the Celtic Deep, part of the wildlife-rich Celtic Seas. We know this area is vital. That’s why we’re leading a pioneering project called the LIFE+ Celtic Seas Partnership, which will help safeguard this precious environment for the people and wildlife that depend on it.

Whether you’re passionate about the UK’s marine wildlife or not, I encourage you to dive headfirst into the images from this year’s BWPA. What you’ll find there will inspire and surprise you.

Photography is a fantastic way of getting outside and connecting with nature. If you’re an amateur photographer who’s tempted by the BWPA but you haven’t taken the plunge yet, I hope the photos at the top of this blog will inspire you to give it a go. I hope to see your images on the judging table next year!

Which images have captured your imagination? Leave us your comments.

Want more info? Why not visit the BWPA website.

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