WWF UK Blog  

A year in focus: 12 inspiring images and WWF’s work in 2013

 

    As WWF-UK’s picture editor, I’m constantly reminded how wonderful our world is. From a hard-won image of a rare Amur tiger to a touching insight into gorilla behaviour, the following images show why our work has never been more vital.

    For the February issue of WWF’s members’ magazine Action, I was asked to select 12 images that show the importance of our work and what conservation has achieved in 2013. Not as easy as it sounds.

    I started by sifting through some incredible photos from the field, WWF’s commissioned shoots from last year, plus a selection of conservation images that I’d either used in our publications or that had really moved me.

    A few deserve a special mention, before I leave you to simply look at them. There are a few images here to highlight our ongoing campaign to keep oil exploration out of Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. We want to protect Virunga’s unique species and habitats, but we also want to promote sustainable livelihoods that serve Virunga’s people in a way that oil never can. So I’ve chosen some of photographer Brent Stirton’s portraits of local people, because they are such an important part of the campaign for me.

    I’ve also included a picture that highlights one of the tough challenges we’re facing: the worrying rise in poaching. So you’ll see an image used in our campaign to tackle illegal wildlife trade, showing seized poachers’ weapons and confiscated stacks of ivory. It serves as a stark reminder of the need to protect vulnerable species.

    There’s also a stunning shot that shows the spirit of true conservation. Last year I sat – captivated – in the audience at WildPhotos 2013 and listened to photographer Toshiji Fukuda. He’s a man who spent 74 freezing days in a remote hide in Russia’s Primorski Krai, where WWF’s Amur leopard adoption project is based, waiting to capture an image of one of the world’s most beautiful creatures – the Amur tiger. He got the shot. I had to include that.

    I’ve also picked photography for its surprising nature, such as a stark image of icebergs that shows the fragility of the Arctic, and for the interesting ways that photographers have captured the essence of our adoption species. I don’t think an image is ever just an image. It’s a chance to raise awareness. I hope that my final selection surprises you with the range of work you support to protect habitats, species and people too. And I hope you feel inspired.

    My photographic highlight of 2013? Toshiji Fukuda’s beautiful image of an orange Amur tiger, burning bright against a remote icy shore. This image sums up not what we do, but why we do it.

    Which images are your favourites? Leave us a comment and we’ll post it on the blog.

    A villager tending to a fishing net in Vitshumbi fishing villageProtecting local livelihoods
    In 2013, we launched a campaign to keep oil exploration out of Virunga, Africa’s oldest national park. People who live and work there know it’s a very special place. We still need your support to protect it. © Brent Stirton / Reportage for Getty Images / WWF-Canon.
    An African elephant, Botswana.Promoting elephant conservation
    © Naturepl.com / Tony Heald / WWF-Canon African elephant (Loxodonta Africana), Chobe National Park, Botswana.
     Sheets of coloured Amazonian wild rubber from the Sky Rainforest Rescue project area, Acre, Brazil.© Ginkgo Agency / Gary Van Wyk. Sheets of coloured Amazonian wild rubber from the Sky Rainforest Rescue project area, Acre, Brazil. Bageni family in the gorilla sector of Virunga National Park, Bukima, Democratic Republic of the Congo© Brent Stirton / Reportage for Getty Images / WWF-Canon. Bageni family in the gorilla sector of Virunga National Park, Bukima, Democratic Republic of the Congo Icebergs broken from glaciers drift south on the east Greenland current. © Robert Van Waarden / WWF-Canon. Icebergs broken from glaciers drift south on the east Greenland current. Evidence of arctic warming is present in widespread melting of glaciers and sea ice.  Lily Cole flying over the Amazon on her visit to the Sky Rainforest Rescue project area in Acre.© Adrian Steirn / Gingko Agency. Lily Cole flying over the Amazon on her visit to the Sky Rainforest Rescue project area in Acre. An African lion© Greg du Toit – find his new book Awe.
    An African lion, Maasai Mara. Photographer Greg du Toit was one of the inspirational speakers at last year’s WWF-sponsored WildPhotos event.
    The Forest Zone diorama, part of the WWF Experience, in the Living Planet Centre. © Stonehouse Photographic / WWF-UK. The Forest Zone diorama, part of the WWF Experience, in the Living Planet Centre. An eco-guard displaying seized poached elephant tusks and poacher's weapons, Oyem, Gabon.© WWF-Canon / James Morgan. Mba Ndong Marius, an eco-guard displaying seized poached elephant tusks and poacher’s weapons, Oyem, Gabon. Villagers tending to their nets in the fishing village of Kavanyongi© Brent Stirton / Reportage for Getty Images / WWF-Canon. Villagers tending to their nets in the fishing village of Kavanyongi on the northern shores of Lake Edward, Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of the Congo. A tiger in the snow, taken in Lazovsky Nature Reserve, Primorski Krai, Russia.© Toshiji Fukuda. Wildlife Photographer of the Year Winner 2013, Gerald Durrell Award for Endangered Species, taken in Lazovsky Nature Reserve, Primorski Krai, Russia. A worker carries a bundle of cotton to put into a suction pipe for making bales in a ginning factory at the Mian Cotton Factory in Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan.© Asim Hafeez. A worker carries a bundle of cotton to put into a suction pipe for making bales in a ginning factory at the Mian Cotton Factory in Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan.

    Related posts


    Comments