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A tree at dawn in Kenya. Image © Fritz Pölking/WWF Coastal Kenya Programme

Adapting to climate change in coastal Kenya communities

There are a number of challenges to adapting to climate change in coastal Kenya communities. Forests and landscapes contribute directly to the well-being and food security of poorer communities. The condition of local forests can have a direct impact on adjacent communities – where huge populations depend on these forests for their livelihoods. However, this […]

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Plastic pollution is threatening marine life © Brent Stirton/Getty Images/WWF-UK Coastal Kenya Programme

Bringing the plastic pollution war closer to home in Kenya

Global nations have come to realise that plastic pollution is choking our oceans, causing irreversible damage to marine biodiversity and ecosystem health. We’re bringing the plastic pollution war closer to home in Kenya. It’s time for everyone to connect the dots and start bending the curve – reversing the decline in wildlife. This cannot wait […]

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Turtle hatchling in Lamu © Jonathan Caramanus/Green Renaissance/WWF-UK

The value of long-term monitoring of marine turtle nesting

For nearly 20 years, we’ve been working closely with local communities in Lamu seascape to monitor and safeguard key marine turtle nesting sites. Community-based patrols have enabled us to collect a wealth of information about the turtles that come to nest on our beaches. Earlier this month, we shared that information with the wider scientific […]

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Ranger looking out © Robert Magori

Maasai Community Scouts: first line of defense in the Mara

There is beauty in ownership. Ownership of a project, property and even rights. But there is greater beauty in conservation when a community owns iconic wildlife heritage bestowed on them and willingly offer to defend them. This is the story of community scouts in the greater Maasai Mara ecosystem. Imagine a family in a remote […]

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The old way of cooking (L) compared to the new stoves being installed (R) climate change

How new cooking stoves are helping Kenya protect its threatened forests

Last Month, WWF led the world in marking the Earth Hour; the world’s biggest environmental event, organized in all continents to create understanding on the issues facing the planet and inspiring people to live more sustainably. While the world was marking the event, here in at WWF in Kwale, Kenya, we were busy putting this […]

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Livestock on the banks of Lake Kenyatta, Lamu, Kenya © John Bett / WWF-Kenya Earth Hour

Efforts to halt the demise of Lake Kenyatta

Lake Kenyatta is one of the largest freshwater bodies in Lamu County, on the north Kenyan coast. It supplies water to an estimated 60,000 people as well as being a critical water source for wildlife and livestock. But the lake is under threat, and those threats are growing. When visiting Lake Kenyatta you can’t miss […]

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Lionesses with their cubs aged 3-6 months walking along a track (Panthera leo), Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya.

Top 10 facts about the magnificent Mara

Following World Mara Day on 15 September, we’ve got the lowdown on this incredible landscape… Mara Day, held on 15 September every year, celebrates the Mara River and the unique surrounding landscape in Kenya and Tanzania. The day coincides with one of nature’s greatest events: the annual migration of wildlife from the Serengeti National Park […]

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Ivory-Inferno-Gabon. Copyright: WWF-Canon / James Morgan Illegal Wildlife trade

Will ivory burn fuel the fire for action?

On Saturday 30 April, the world’s largest ever ivory destruction will take place. Kenya will be burning 105 tonnes of ivory, along with 1.5 tonnes of rhino horn, in Nairobi National Park. This will be a strong symbolic gesture that Kenya will not tolerate the illegal wildlife trade that is killing so many of its […]

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Ranger looking out © Robert Magori

6 reasons we’re on the lookout for black rhinos in Kenya

Black rhinos in African have suffered huge reductions in the past, mainly due to poaching. Listed as Critically Endangered under the IUCN Red List, there are currently about 5000 animals remaining in the wild (there were 65,000 in 1970).  As part of WWF-UK’s support work to raise numbers and improve security around the species – […]

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